War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft


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Liaquat Ahamed, Pulitzer Prize—winning author of Lords of Finance Although this thoroughly researched book is designed more for students of international relations and policymakers than casual readers, it is worth buying. Confident about the American mission in the world, the book is a lesson about how creative thinking can promote our interests without risk to blood and treasure.

Tom Rogan Washington Free Beacon Geoeconomics, the use of economic instruments to advance foreign policy goals, has long been a staple of great-power politics. Christopher J. Fettweis H-Net Reviews. Convert currency. Add to Basket. Condition: New. Seller Inventory M More information about this seller Contact this seller. Book Description Belknap Press, Never used!. Seller Inventory P Brand New!. Seller Inventory VIB Ships with Tracking Number!

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Blackwill; Jennifer M. War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft. Indeed, given how much we hear about the need for a military response to a rising China or cyber threats, it is interesting to approach these problems from a non-military perspective while noting that military force will still obviously be needed. In this sense, the book is useful. It is clearly written and they authors make their points and policy prescriptions easy to follow. US foreign policy is in complete disarray at best and global leaders are beginning to recognize that the willingness of the United States to maintain its mantle of global leadership is on the wane.

The election made that clear and Americans voted in a man with a strictly anti-global agenda. They will not go away in — Trumpism will not end with Trump. But the idea that the US would be able to conduct such a strategy under Trump is now unthinkable. Rather than challenging US leadership rivals, the US is willingly withdrawing. Increasingly, other countries increasingly see China as the next major global leader — whatever new challenge this many bring.

The authors hardly could have predicted this, of course, but it made for a depressing read to remember the world that was. More nuance here would have lessened this sometimes cartoonish view of China. Although to be fair, this was not the central aim of the book. Third this book is directed at a certain kind of American reader ie: Council on Foreign Relations member. For example, while Canadian readers will get much out of the diagnosis of the problems that the authors identify the willingness of international actors to subvert economic ends to state interest and challenges for recognizing and deal with it the solutions are all directed towards the United States.

Again, I do not think this is entirely a bad thing, but non-American readers should go in realizing this. There is a suggestion that NAFTA should be updated and revitalized but no real plan on how to do this. Overall, however, I did learn from this book and I am actively considering using the chapter on the history of US geoeconomics in my International Security class.

Mar 04, Andrew rated it it was ok Shelves: foreign-policy , non-fiction. In the introduction to this book the authors identify the biggest challenge for the US if it is to flex more geoeconomic muscle. America is the champion of the rules-based international order, which forswears the type of arbitrariness relied upon by Russia and China in their pursuit of geoeconomic leverage.

War by Other Means

So how can the US respond to these adversaries in kind, without undermining the international order which it has maintained - at great benefit to itself - for the last seventy years? Unfortuna In the introduction to this book the authors identify the biggest challenge for the US if it is to flex more geoeconomic muscle. But I thought the book would have been much stronger if it had grappled in more detail with how the US can practice geoeconomics while remaining loyal to the principles of the liberal international order.

War By Other Means is high on concept and short on reality. While the authors spend a lot of time describing how China and Russia impact the rules-based multilateral Bretton Woods institutions, they do not specifically outline a different logic or strategy that the US could offer as a substitute.

Book Review: ‘War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft,’ by Robert D. Blackwill and Jennifer

Oct 01, Shawn rated it really liked it Shelves: economics , diplomacy , history , international-relations , political-science , political-theory. Blackwill outlines a pressing case for re-evaluating and updating the American foreign relations toolkit. New geopolitical realities and increasingly challenging powers such as China and Russia represent a critical threat to American national interests in Eurasia and Asia.

They, and other challengers to American global primacy, have become adept at projecting power by means other than military, primarily through geoeconomics.

American statesmen were once adepts at using both military and geoecon Blackwill outlines a pressing case for re-evaluating and updating the American foreign relations toolkit. American statesmen were once adepts at using both military and geoeconomic tools to project, reinforce, and promote the American interest. Unfortunately, a philosophical shift and American domestic politics have both cause US policy makers to sour on the potential of geoeconomics.

Meanwhile, through state capitalist and neo-mercantilist policies, the challengers to a liberal, democratic, capitalists order have developed geoeconomic tools that do not play by rule-based paradigms. If the US is to continue lead the international order, it must re-adopt geoeconomic strategies, re-assess the prevalence of military based strategies, and reaffirm and more aggressively pursue the national interest.

Sep 24, Chad Manske rated it really liked it. Drawing on extensive government experience and strong scholarship, they make a compelling case of strong US geoeconomy supported by other strong instruments.

War by Other Means

A great read needed in times such as these. Nov 20, Brandon rated it really liked it Shelves: my-bookshelf , non-fiction , school.

War by other means : geoeconomics and statecraft

The authors mesh geopolitics and economics in a useful, practical way that is never too heady. Their concept of geoeconomics seems to be a much more timely framework for understanding state aggression than more traditional models of geopolitics might be, although their geoeconomics is itself not a top-down framework like, say, defensive or offensive realism. A great book for those wanting to learn a way to interpret daily international news, which today almost always exists in an economic contex The authors mesh geopolitics and economics in a useful, practical way that is never too heady.

A great book for those wanting to learn a way to interpret daily international news, which today almost always exists in an economic context and with economic vocabulary.


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It is worth the read for the amount of information and insights. However, it becomes a dry read with lots of jargon and repetition. The authors also insist on using the term "geoeconomics" at least 4 times per page which can be annoying. Aug 25, Muhammad Murad rated it it was amazing.

War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft

Geoeconomics is the use of economic tools to achieve geopolitical advantages. A major part of this book talks about the geoeconomics of China and the US. However, it also briefly talks about the geoeconomics of Russia, the Gulf states, India, E. U, Iran and Israel. Nov 02, Jacob Hoeflich rated it liked it. Indeed it is nteresting to see how economic maneuvering by nation-states interacts with their geo-political goals. Jul 07, Mariana Afonso rated it really liked it. An enlightening view on Geoeconomics that balances conceptualisation, history and practical examples of the phenomenon.

Jan 02, Damon rated it really liked it. This book is a solid addition to the volume of economic policy literature. Blackwill and Harris provide a dense appeal for a greater role for the use of economic measures to advance foreign policy objectives, a term Blackwill and Harris term "geoeconomics". The first item to note is that the title is misleading. Only rarely do Blackwill and Harris talk about geoeconomics as a tool of war. Rather, they provide a survey of how Russia and China use economic measures as foreign policy tools, and the This book is a solid addition to the volume of economic policy literature.

Rather, they provide a survey of how Russia and China use economic measures as foreign policy tools, and then provide recommendations on how the United States could--and should--incorporate more economic measures as means to advance foreign policy goals rather than focus almost exclusively on military means to achieve foreign policy ends.

Policies governing everything from trade and investment to energy and exchange rates are wielded as tools to win diplomatic allies, punish adversaries, and coerce those in between. Not so in the United States, however. America still too often reaches for the gun over the purse to advance its interests abroad. The result is a playing field sharply tilting against the United States. In this impressive policy manifesto, Blackwill and Harris argue that in recent decades, the United States has tended to neglect this form of statecraft, while China, Russia, and other illiberal states have increasingly employed it to Washington's disadvantage.

War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft
War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft
War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft
War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft
War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft
War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft
War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft
War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft

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